Springvale Saison

Style:
French & Belgian-Style Saison
Stage:
Brewed
Brewed:
2014-07-22
Packaged:
2014-09-28
Volume:
10 gallons
OG:
1.072
FG:
1.008
ABV:
8.8
IBU:
24.2
SRM:
4.5

This is an attempt to take advantage of Phoenix's summer heat, both indoors and outdoors, by brewing a traditional farmhouse ale. The grist, aside from the sugar, is borrowed from my standard Kolsch recipe, to better allow a direct comparison of the different yeast and fermentation profile. This will be my first brew with the improved mill gap settings (credit card method), as well as my first ferment in a re-purposed 15.5 gallon Sanke keg.

Ingredients

AmountNameType%/IBUNotes
20.0 lbsAmerican 2-rowGrain87.0%
1.0 lbsAmerican Munich 10LGrain4.3%
1.0 lbsRed Wheat MaltGrain4.3%
1.0 lbsCane SugarSugar4.3%Added after boil, during fermentation. Adds 4.6 gravity points to OG reading.
1.25 ozNorthern Brewer (8.3% AA) Boil 60 minHop18.2 IBU
1.0 ozFuggle (3.4% AA) Boil 10 minHop6.0 IBU

Yeast

Wyeast 3724, fresh pack. 4500ml stirplate starter, 1.037 OG, with a 1000ml yeast harvest decanted to sterile jars. Remaining 3500ml cold-crashed, thick slurry pitched.

Water

13.4 gallons, RO, 0ppm. 8.8g CaSO4 and 10.1g CaCl added to create a balanced water profile.

Mash

60 min mash at 151F. Heat 7.0 gallons of strike water to 166F, transfer to mash tun. Allow 10 min to stabilize temperature, add malt, stir until reading 151F. Double batch sparge with 3.2 gallons each time, at 170F.

Boil

60 min boil, vigorous. Hop additions at 60 min and 10 min. Irish moss at 15 min, wort chiller at 10 min. Chill to 80F and transfer to fermenter.

Fermentation

Oxygenate 60 seconds with O2 and 2 micron air stone, and pitch thick yeast slurry. Ferment at room temperature, 82-87F this time of year, until terminal gravity is reached. Move to warmer area if necessary.

Readings

First runnings gravity21.6 bx, 1.092 SG
Pre-boil gravity1.062 SG
Pre-boil volume11.8 gallons
Post-boil gravity15.6 bx, 1.067 SG
Post-boil volume 10 gallons

Notes

  • My refractometer isn't functioning properly. Efficiency initially looked disastrous, but is actually quite good. All readings need to be double-checked against a hydrometer until a consistent correction factor for the refractometer can be determined. This problem may be weather related – the refractometer offers automatic temperature compensation (ATC), but the outside temperature today of 112F may be outside the ATC's limits.
  • The new method of heating the mash tun by overshooting the temperature, letting the heat stabilize, and then adding the grain made for a much more consistent mash temperature. Needs fine tuning, but it seems well worth the trade-off in time.
  • It's going to be tricky getting a sample from the Sanke keg, but necessary – Wyeast 3724 is notorious for stuck fermentations, and kegging a saison at 1.035 would be disastrous.